23 April 2012

Stitch Magazine's Pin-Tuck Skirt: Complete


When I first saw the cover of Stitch Magazine's winter 2008 issue, I had to have it.  How could I not like this skirt??  It has an asymmetrical design, pleated button closure, and peeks of colour from the inner fabric - all delicious details that make for cuteness on the hips!
 
Perusing through the rest of the magazine, I saw the pin-tuck skirt below.  This skirt isn't as detailed as the one featured on the cover, but it's still different from the average a-line. Since I wasn't sure of how either skirt would fit, I opted for the simplest of the two to get started.


If you're interested in this issue of the magazine, it's no longer available in print.  You'll have to purchase a digital copy from Interweave (publisher) for $9.99.  The out-of-print copies sometimes go on sale at half off, so if you're in no big rush to acquire the magazine, wait for the sale!  Word of caution:  the patterns for this magazine aren't available for download.  I put in a request on PR for someone who had the magazine and was able to borrow her issue to copy these two patterns.

On with the review...

Fabric & Notions:
  • one yard of 100% linen from the stash
  • 7" invisible zipper
  • one yard of ambiance bemberg lining
  • petersham ribbon cut to waist measurement plus a little extra
Pattern Sizing:
I don't know what standard is used in determining the US size in parentheses, so I've listed the waist and hip measurements, respectively, for each pattern size.

XS (size 4) 26¾", 36"
S (sizes 6–8) 29¼", 38"
M (sizes 10–12) 31¾", 40½"
L (sizes 14–16) 34¾", 43½"
XL (sizes 18–20) 38¾", 47½"

There are only two pattern pieces.  Based on my hip measurements at the time, I traced a size large.  Since then, I lost several pounds and ended up sewing the equivalent of a medium.  I didn't make any alterations to the length, nor did I add any extra width to the back (like I normally do) to compensate for the junk in my trunk.

Instructions:

While the instructions are simple and easy to follow, I didn't use them.  Here's what I did instead:
  1. You're instructed to sew the darts, zipper, and side seams before making the tucks.  I suppose if you're not using a pin-tuck foot, then this order of sewing isn't that bad.  In any event, I sewed the darts, made the tucks, inserted the zipper, and then sewed the side seams.
  2. The waist is finished by folding under 0.5" twice and stitching in place.  I didn't think this would provide enough support, so I finished the waist with petersham as detailed in this post.
  3. The instructions have you finish the hem in the same manner as the waist.  I used the rolled hem stitch on my serger.
Adjusting the Pattern for Lining:

There are three tucks on the front and four on the back.  My skirt only has six tucks because I inadvertently missed one.  To ensure that the lining's waist circumference was the same as the skirt's after the tucks were sewn, I estimated the tuck uptake and divided this number by four, since there are two darts on both the front and back pattern pieces.  I widened each dart at the waist's edge, tapering to nothing at the dart point.



Conclusion:
This is a decent pattern and the tucks add a hint of visual interest.  Unlined, the garment is very quick to sew and a great wardrobe builder. While I will may or may not make this again, I will definitely try the asymmetric skirt. 

That's all for now.  Until next time, happy Monday!

L



4 comments:

  1. Cute pintucked skirt! I have that magazine. I loved the skirt on the cover and intended to make it. Someday.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I think that the magazine edition of the skirt pattern (on the cover had an error--they had an errata sheet/pdf on their website for a while). you might want to double check with other sewists.

    Rose in SV

    ReplyDelete
  3. Cute Skirt, looks really lovely on you

    ReplyDelete
  4. your skirt is really cute. I never saw that issue of the magazine but saw it on someone's blog post. I can remember dreaming about the cover skirt. thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for commenting! I appreciate and read them all - even if I can not personally respond.

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