03 October 2012

BWOF 8-2005-102 (skirt) & Thank you!!


What can I say?  I adore this skirt!  I love how the bias lower half gives that little oomph to an otherwise plain skirt.  Even though I have many more skirt patterns in queue, I just might  make another one of these.

Fabric &Notions:
  • 1.5 yards of 60" wool tweed with metallic threads
  • about 2 yards of 45" brown Ambiance lining
  • 7" invisible zipper
  • 1.5" wide light brown petersham cut to waist measurement plus extra for overhang
Alterations:

I made my standard 1.25" full seat adjustment by adding a wedge at the center back as described in this post.  I also lopped off 1.25" from the hem for a more flattering length.  I probably should have taken half of this alteration out of both the lower and upper halves so that the proportions remained roughly the same.  I don't think things look off, but if I make this again, I'll probably take some of the length out of the upper half.

Seam Allowances:

BWOF/Burda Style magazine patterns do not have added seam allowances.  This can be both a good and bad thing.  The good thing is you are free to add whatever seam allowance you want, anywhere you want.  For my skirt, I added 1/2" on the side and waist seams, and 3/8" along the curved edge.  The smaller seam allowance along the curved edge made for much easier sewing and manipulation without having to clip the fabric.  Additionally, exact pattern measurements are easy to make and all alterations are done right at the seamline.  I usually add my seam allowances right on the fabric.


The bad thing, for me at least, is sometimes I forget to add seam allowances.  Ummm....yeah.  I know that I need to, but I get distracted, start cutting and don't realize I'd forgotten the seam allowances until after I start sewing. 

Lining, Waist Treatment, and Zipper:

I used my favourite method of lining without facings as described in an older post.  I also cut the lower half of the lining on the bias but could have cut it on the straight grain or without the flare as shown in this PR member's review.


The pattern is drafted to include a buttoned waistband.  I didn't include it because I assumed I would need to contour it a bit to account for my sway back.  I didn't feel like doing any of that and just faced the waist with petersham.

I completely forgot to interface the zipper area.  Fortunately, the fabric is sturdy enough where I don't have any ripples or puckers.  I have to make it a practice to do this all the time.  I remember to do it with pants, but somehow the practice escapes me when it comes to skirts.  I'll work on it. =)


Construction:

The side seams were finished on my serger, then sewn on my sewing machine.  The seam that joins the upper and lower halves were sewn first, serged together, and pressed up.  Finally after allowing the skirt and lining to hang for 24+ hours, both hems were finished with my serger's rolled hem stitch.  I didn't want to distort the bias by attempting to fold up a half-inch hem.

Conclusion:

It's a fantastic skirt with nice details and a great way to get started with sewing BWOF patterns.  The skirt is simple enough that the instructions can be ignored.  Honestly, I don't even think I looked at them.  Anyone who's ever sewn a skirt can definitely sew this one!


Finally, I would like to extend heartfelt thanks to everyone who left such wonderful comments about my wardrobe.  That was so kind of you to stop by and share your thoughts!  I'm smiling all over again. =)

L





4 comments:

  1. What a lovely skirt!, you can be part of my Carnival too! About the wedge you added to the back of the skirt - I have a slight problem with my skirts being shorter in the back than the front. I usually just decrease the back hem to accommodate my problem. Would adding a wedge eliminate my problem???

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  2. I've had a lot of success with adding the wedge. My skirts always used to hike up in the back because of my full seat. Rather than alter at the hem, I added extra length to the CB so that there was enough fabric to go over my rear. It's this reason that our hems are always uneven: the garment tries to go over the curves and runs out of room at the end. If you were to view my skirts on a hanger, the back is longer than the front, but when I wear them, the hem is even. Try it out! It's a really simple alteration to make, too.

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  3. Looks great :-). I make sure the skirt is wide enough for my full seat and then add deeper darts at the back waist for a better fit.

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Thanks for commenting! I appreciate and read them all - even if I can not personally respond.

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