23 November 2014

New Look 6407: Wearable Wadder?

I don't make wearable muslins.  A muslin is my chance at working on the fit and if I try to make it wearable, then I won't focus on getting the fit right.

But what about a wearable wadder?  Seems counter-intuitive.

The shirt is wearable because it's finished and fits - almost.  There is serious pulling at the center front which is weird because it's the same pattern that I used to make the first version - which I absolutely adore.


Despite the busy print, there is no pulling at bust level. 

I think the purple shirt is a wadder because of the fabric.  I used a stretch-cotton poplin which may not be the best fabric for a structured blouse with lots of seams.  Taming the wrinkles is next to impossible and a bad press job is amplified.  I have a gravity feed iron that gets hella hot with lots of steam and the wrinkles act like the T-1000 from Terminator 2:  I walk away for 5 minutes and the wrinkles are back and with an attitude.

I am totally MEH about this blouse.  I am going to make a third version of the pattern out of a non-stretch fabric to see if my suspicions hold true.  In the meantime, I haven't decided if I will keep this one.  If I do, I will not wear it without a jacket or something to cover the awefulness.

The skirt in the photos is New Look 6053 and was sewn from stash fabric.  1.5 yards down, over 600 left to go.  Good grief.

I'll talk about that project in the next post. 

Have you ever worn a wadder?  What are your experiences with stretch cotton poplin?

L

29 comments:

  1. Just saw your comment on my post--your shirt is definitely a candidate for "Can This Garment Be Saved?"

    What fabric was the first version made from?

    LOVE that your wrinkles have attitude. :)

    Maybe it should sit in the magic closet for a while?

    I don't know that I've ever worked with stretch cotton poplin before but I have worked with stretch sateen and I don't think I'll do that again--not only are there wrinkles but they are *shiny* wrinkles.

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    1. p.s. I like the proportions of having the skirt tucked in vs out, not that it's bad out, but it looks super flattering tucked in.

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    2. The first shirt was made out of a rather stiff 100% cotton shirting. I had to use a microtex needle to get good stitches. Despite the construction fuss, the shirt fits very well. These wrinkles have a serious attitude!

      I've worked with stretch cotton sateen as well and had the same experience. I think stretch cottons work best with patterns that have only a few seams and curves. I made some skirts made of stretch cotton satins/poplins and didn't have this problem. I made a dress with darts and princess seams out of the same fabric and threw it away; it was horrible!

      You're totally right about having the shirt tucked in. Not tucked makes the outfit look sloppy.

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  2. You look amazing in all the pics, but the shirt tucked in makes it perfect. I love the color also. The wrinkles must be coming from the fabric, and the style lines. Compare all areas with the blouse below and you can see the stiffer fabric holds the shape of the sleeve etc. It's a great pattern for you :-)

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    1. Thank you Mary. I agree that if I wear this shirt, tucking it in is the way to go. When I compare the first two pictures, the second looks way more streamlined and much neater. Thanks for the feedback!

      The fabric is definitely the culprit. I started working on a third version of this pattern out of a non-stretch cardboard (I mean cotton) and I am not having nearly the same problem. There are wrinkles, though, that are driving me nuts. Details on that to come.

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  3. Attitudinal wrinkles - love. Lol!!!

    The B5678 shirt I made from grey stretch cotton poplin got its buttons unceremoniously cut off, and was thrown in the trash!

    I couldn't get "clean" seams, forget topstitching the princess seams and it was wrinkly. :/

    I do love the color and the fit but I know how it is when you finish something and it just doesn't make your heart sing. I vote too for magic closet while you make #3. Then decide of this one is worth keeping.

    Yay for sewing down the stash!!

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    1. I really like B5678 and have it in the rotation to try. Stretch cotton poplin is just not for shirts with lots of seams. Unless someone can tell me what I'm doing wrong, I don't see many more attempts with that fabric. And I have a lot of it. =/

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  4. For me personally, anything that pulls across the centre front just tends to drive me more and more insane over the course of the day, so it would probably end up at most in very low rotation.

    I absolutely love that skirt on you and agree with everyone else who said that the top + skirt combo looks fabulous with the top tucked in.

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    1. "Low rotation" = "trash" in my book. =) It's not even worthy enough for donating because the wrinkles are that hiddy. I took it from the magic floor and put it in the magic closet for a few days. Methinks I'll be cutting off the buttons and sending it on its magic merry way. =)

      Top tucked in +1

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  5. I've can't remember ever working with stretch poplin so I have no clue there. But I have had garments that I did not consider a wadder until I actually wore them. In most cases I have immediately rushed home to make the adjustments and saved the majority, meaning there were some that there was no hope for.

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    1. I tried saving wadders, but my attention quickly changes to something else. I made a pair of Kwik Sew 2690 pants out of rayon-poly-lycra suiting that stretched out in the worst of ways. I can take the pants off without unbuttoning/unzipping. I said that I would replace the waistband with a new non-stretchable one. Yeeeeeeeeeeah. I gave them away a day after that thought. =)

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  6. I like the shirt, but I'm with westmoon--I end up not wearing anything that pulls at CF like that. If I really like the fabric, I'll wear a cami underneath and wear it unbuttoned to a bit below my bust.

    I haven't had good luck with stretch poplin either. I haven't bought any in several years, and if you've seen my stash, that's saying something.

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    1. I went on a SCP binge because I thought the extra stretch would help with fitting. Maybe that's true with a smaller, less pronounced bust curve. I haven't had good luck with this fabric in the last few tries. Time to try something. I really need shirts and this pattern fits.

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  7. Lynne - You have to be comfortable in what you wear. Personally I think that it would have less pulling and be a better fit than RTW often are - we get so picky with what we make. I think the outfit looks fabulous together but you know what you feel comfy in. Perhaps as Michelle mentioned put a cami under and unbutton some of those pesky buttons.

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    1. You're absolutely right - we must be comfortable in what we wear. I'm not comfortable in this shirt and I know I can do better. Thank you!

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  8. I must say I would have to make a muslin. Like Westmoon, anything pulling across the chest area drives me nuts. Like you I never would sew one because everything normally would fit. Now that I'm getting back in to sewing I have to make one to build my confidence up when I will automatically know what needs to be adjusted and such. Once I know then I'm good.

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    1. I usually make muslins and made a muslin of the pattern before I completed the first version. I used regular muslin fabric and didn't consider how SCP would take to lots of vertical seams. I'm trying it again; hopefully I'll get better results!

      Good for getting back into sewing! Every time we try, we build skills and confidence.

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  9. I love that you say "wearable wadder" lol! I've had a few of those, but I agree with BeaJay in that you must be comfortable in what you wear. I've never sewn with poplin; however, I've heard a few people mention that it's not always the best in terms of taking a press and so forth.

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    1. Haha. Thanks Candice. Cotton is my friend, stretch cotton seems to have a nasty disposition. =) BTW, I love your latest shirt - B5678. I saw that on PR and thought girlfriend is on fierce mode once again!

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  10. I agree, stretch fabrics are designed for simple cuts only. I even find that ordinary poplin is hard to topstitch and wrinkles like made down the seam. I thought it was my technique, but I have a RTW one that does just the same. So that makes wrinkles okay in my opinion! For a wearable wadder that is. My point of view on these not so good garments is keep them for a while and see if they come in useful - I find less than perfect clothes are good for dirty jobs, unseen jobs, even sewing! With the sizing, my guess is that even though it is the same pattern, the seams were a tiny bit different, the cutting a tiny bit different. With stretch at least it accommodates curves.

    But if you do not feel good in this, do not wear it out, and do not wear it on a low day :)

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    1. It's interesting, really. I have a SCP shirt that has a bit of polyester and doesn't show any wrinkles on the vertical seams. This shirt, however, is a mess!

      I actually cleaned out Area 51 and have only two (!!!) items hanging in there: the stalled trench coat and this blouse. I'll let it hang for a while and try something else. I have several really nice SCP fabrics that I hope can be made into wearable garments. As you said, the thing is to find a pattern that has minimal seams where the curves can be accentuated.

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  11. I am grateful for the warning about stretch poplin. Time is so precious, a difficult fabric can make sewing very discouraging. I think the color is really beautiful on you. Did you try starching the fabric to see if it helps keep the wrinkles and attitude from coming back? I know that doesn't always last throughout the day, but it might be worth trying.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. "Time is so precious, a difficult fabric can make sewing very discouraging."

      Absolutely! This is why I am not upset about chucking the whole thing if it doesn't work out. I like sewing and already have enough that can derail the sewjo. I can't let the problems with this blouse bring me down!

      Yes I did try spray starch but was unsuccessful because the can I have has an expiration date (?) of 2005. Oops. Obviously I don't use spray starch much. =) I tried to use what was there and it just oozed out of the tip. Hah!

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  12. I HATE stretch fabrics.... Period! I totally hear you about the pressing issue. I used a stretch poplin for a safari jacket which I wear a lot and love. But the damn wrinkles on the sleeve seams drive me crazy even if 99% of the whole human race would never notice.

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    1. Isn't that the truth?! No one will notice except us. =) I don't mind stretch fabrics, but they have to be paired with the right pattern. Because of the changes I made, NL6407 has five vertical seams. That's five chances for me to swear more than I should. LOL

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  13. I really like this blouse! In the photos, there doesn't appear to be any "gaping" that would show "the girls" and if so, I would toss it because it's really, pretty!

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  14. ...BTW, you could probably just wear it open over a cami with jeans or shorts in the summer!

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  15. I was just going to say what Myra said... Unbutton the top 2-3 buttons, put on a camisole, esp. One with lace on top... (Not in this order), And continue looking great! :)

    I love that top middle picture with the shirt tucked in....that's sooooo stylish! Keep in smiling, sister!

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Thanks for commenting! I appreciate and read them all - even if I can not personally respond.

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