07 June 2015

Need Your Help!

I've been working on a trench coat for the past couple of weeks.  Things were going along smoothly and as I neared the finish, this happened:


What.  The.  What.

Never mind the wonkiness of the sleeves; the lining is attached, but not pulled all the way through.

There is some serious WTFery going on with the front facings and I don't know what to do.


The pattern is BWOF 9-2006-104.  I cut size 44 and made a few alterations (to be detailed in a future post).  I doubt the alterations have anything to do with the facing issue.  I checked and double checked seam lengths etc. before cutting the fashion fabric.  I did *not* do an FBA, so there were no substantial changes to the front or front facings.
The shell is 100% cotton twill with no stretch; the lining is 100% silk broadcloth.

When cutting out the fashion fabric, I added the seam allowances right on the fabric.  This is what I do with all patterns that don't already have seam allowances.  I've not had any problems doing it this way.  

However, I did add seam allowances to the lining pieces first since (1) the lining is a slippery silk and (2) it's plaid.  I carefully cut each lining piece in a single layer and used a rotary cutter to decrease the risk of shifting.

The shell and lining pieces were definitely cut on grain; I'm a little neurotic about this.  I may cut corners in other areas of sewing, but not with establishing and matching the grain.

The hem is supposed to be 1.5 inches.  So, I removed 1 inch from the lining pattern pieces with the intention of bagging the lining and having a o.5-inch jump pleat for a bit of vertical ease. (Edited to add: Actually the jump pleat will be slightly less than 0.5 inches due to sewing the lining to the hem. The pleat will probably measure about 0.25 inches.)

To attach the facing to the front, I folded the facing back, right sides together, and stitched across the facing 1.5 inches from the bottom.  When I turned the facing right side out, this is what I get on both sides:


The front facing length is the same as the front length.  I figured I could trim the extra bit off after the facing was attached (as shown below).  Do you see the bubble?  I don't understand what went wrong.  When I removed the horizontally-sewn stitches, the bubble disappeared.



I thought that perhaps I measured something incorrectly and "added" the cut piece back by doing a little surgery.


The bubble is still there.

I thought about this a lot after taking and staring at the photos.  I think something may be fishy about the lining-facing seam.  The last two photos are when the jacket is "at rest," i.e., without me holding it.



Could this be the source of the weird front pulling?

I am confident I shortened the front lining piece 1".  I checked the pattern piece and see the notation.  The strange thing is this lining piece seam is the same length as the facing piece seam which WAS NOT shortened.  I know I shortened it because the other lining seam length matches the side front seam length.  That wouldn't have been the case if I hadn't made the alteration.

Sigh.

Any suggestions??  Pleeeeeeeease.  I put a lot of work into this coat and am not ready to give up.  I have more of the fabric to cut new facings, but I don't have any more lining and can't get any more.

I was two minutes away from sewing the buttonholes, but I was worried about how they would sew with the weird pulling in the facing.

I unpicked all of the topstitching and "unbagged" the lining so that I can get this right.

I really appreciate any ideas or help you can give!

Thanks!

L


21 comments:

  1. I think your best bet would be to finish the lining by hand and not bag it. It takes longer, but you can ensure that everything is smooth and doesn't bubble.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah yes, let the lining hang loose. I did this on my last two coats and will probably have to do this. I'd like to figure out what happened because I plan to use this same pattern again for a heavy winter coat. Thank you for the suggestion.

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  2. Did you interface with fusible interfacing? I find it can shrink pattern pieces substantially. I now fuse onto fabric and then cut the pieces , as I have lost up to an 1 1/2 " when doing it the other way. As well, did you preshrink your cotton twill? It may have shrunk with all the pressing....Hopefully you can get it sorted out.
    Barb

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good questions, thank you. I neglected to address this in the post.

      Yes, the facings are interfaced with a fusible weft. I've used this interfacing successfully on jackets and coats. I did not use any steam when fusing, however I do use steam when pressing the seam allowances.

      The cotton twill was preshrunk. I washed and dried once with the intention of dry-cleaning it in the future. The silk was not pretreated.

      Delete
  3. Oh my dear, I am so sorry that this happened. Let the lining hang loose and just tack in strategic places. Save your gorgeous coat.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Faye. This seems to be the general consensus and what I will do.

      Delete
  4. I agree with the others. Let the lining hang loose.

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  5. Hmm - sorry - don't have enough experience to give in on this discussion. Trench looks like it will be lovely once sorted.

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  6. I can't offer much of a solution, other than I had this happen to me once, and as others have suggested, I just let the lining hang loose and tacked it in a few places. I don't know what happened with my jacket--I wish I did. With my pattern, there were even separate lining pattern pieces, so I know that it wasn't some user error thing on my part.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I took some time yesterday to measure the pieces again. I suspect something happened when I traced the pattern. I'll write a post describing what I think may be the issue. It's weird, though, because everything else matched up so nicely during construction.

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  7. I've had this happen with bagged linings before and had trouble even with short jackets.. I came to the conclusion that even if two pieces of material are the same length when measured out in the flat they can hang very differently with different 'give'. I never cut linings shorter than garment pieces and always finish them last for this reason. So, I'm with the other person that said unpick the lining (and possibly the bottom edge of the facing too) then pin into place when the garment is on a hanger or dummy. That way you will find out what's doing the pulling.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When I line skirts, I normally don't cut the lining shorter than the skirt fabric either. After finishing the waist and fitting the skirt, the lining may need to be shorter or longer than previously assumed. I think I will have to start doing this with coats as well.

      I will unpick the stitching holding the lining to the facing and let the coat hang for a couple of days.

      Thank you Valerie!

      Delete
  8. Ahh. this reminds me of my sleeve issue!!! There was no rhyme or reason to it :(

    Could be just a snafu with this combo of fabric+interfacing+lining. You know how finicky things can be :/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes, I remember the sleeve issue. It could be the fabric combo that's aiding the wonkiness. Sigh. I am determined to finish this coat.

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  9. Yes, I would undo, let the lining hang loose, smooth the facing down and pin and stitch so that it doesn't bubble.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm on it! Thanks Sarah Liz. =)

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  10. I agree with Michelle. I partially bag my lining, because of past issues with the hem line/lining. I now machine stitch the lining to the jacket/coat at the neckline, sometimes I will machine stitch along the fronts. Honestly, I do better just machine stitching at the neckline and hand sewing the front edges and then lastly the hemline. I iron a fold along the hemline, place the lining edge into the fold and adjust for overhang ease and then pin to hold & hand stitch.

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  11. Sorry that you have a puzzling problem! I have no suggestions how to fix it. :(

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  12. I was thinking about this for a bit and came back here and everyone is pretty much saying what I was thinking, just let the lining hang loose.

    "Hang loose", as they say in Hawaii!

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for commenting! I appreciate and read them all - even if I can not personally respond.

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