31 August 2015

BWOF 9-2006-104 (trench coat): Complete

The coat is done!  Though it took a lot of movement from the universe to make this happen, it is finally completed.  


Fabric & Notions
  • 3 yards of cotton navy twill (stash; Fabric Mart)
  • 3 yards of plaid silk broadcloth (stash; Fabric Mart)
  • 1 package of red piping (stash; source unknown)
  • fusible interfacing (Mood NYC)
  • navy mottled buttons (Wawak)
  • navy mottled belt buckle (Mood NYC)
  • short piece of twill tape to use for hanging
  • bias cut fleece strips for sleeve heads
  • muslin for back stay
  • 80/12 universal needle (for shell)
  • 70/10 microtex needle (for lining)
  • regular sewing and serger thread

Size and Pattern Alterations:  I traced and cut a straight size 44 for my muslin.  I compared the pieces to another shoulder princess seamed coat (Indygo Junction 740) and was happy to see that not many changes were needed.  I used 5/8" seam allowances all around.  I sewed 3/4" seams at the start of the shoulder princess seam on both the front and back as a cheater narrow-shoulder adjustment.  Then, I tapered to 5/8" above the bust and 1/2" at the bust for a little extra room.

I did a 1" swayback adjustment by removing the length completely in the waist area and adding the amount to the hem.  This way, the side back seam lengths remained the same.


I took out a 1" wedge below the neckline; the muslin showed a bit of bunching in this area.

I also shortened the sleeves 3 inches (1.5 inches in two places).


I did not add a hem allowance since the "unfinished" length was slightly longer than what I wanted.

Instructions:  My brain was no match for this Burda word salad.  In addition to the instructions being sparse and confusing, you are to jump back and forth to other views for different parts.  Yeah no.  To construct the majority of the coat, I used the instructions for McCall's 5525.   To make the inseam pockets and pocket flaps, I used the ironically less confusing word salad from Burda 8-2009-107

Construction:  Sewing the shell was pretty straight forward; it's cotton after all.  The fabric was easy to work with and pressed beautifully.  The lining, on the other hand, was a pain in the ass.  Me and slippery fabrics just don't get along; plus the lining is a plaid.  It's an even plaid, but still.  Even though I pinned carefully and sewed slowly, I only managed to marginally match the plaid.  Using a walking foot made it WORSE! 


I brought this on my self.  =)  I had to have THIS lining with THIS fabric come hell or high water.  Yeah well, it was hell on high water, but I made it work.

Front/Front Facing Problem:  As many suggested and as I suspected, the lengths of the front and front facing were off.  Somehow, the front was 1/4 to 1/2 an inch longer than the facing.  This minute amount caused the massive amount of pulling.  I must have erred in tracing/measuring - despite checking my work twice.  Oh well.  

Kenneth D. King fixed it by taking a deeper hem and trimming the excess.  He also corrected the pattern by creating new stitching lines on both the facing and front.  The fix resulted in the coat being shorter, but it at least it's not pulling wildly like before.  I was ready to send this coat to a watery death in the Detroit River.  

I had the coat professionally pressed by my dry cleaner.   


Other:  I removed the sleeve loops because they were way too close to the hem.  If I make this pattern again, I will move the placement lines up 1.5 to 2 inches so that they're more proportionally positioned.

I added some red piping between the facing and lining because why not?  I did this on my last two coats and really like it.


The one thing I'm bummed about is the wrinkling along the bust curve.  



I picked and restitched this area a couple of times and steam-pressed it over and over.  Of course it's on the side that's not covered by the flap.  o_O  If I had enough fabric, I would have recut the side front panel and sewed it again.  Oh well.

I used navy mottled buttons in two sizes (large for the front and small for the epaulettes and belt loops).  It was surprisingly difficult to find a navy mottled belt buckle.  Thank you Mood!


Conclusion:  I am very happy with coat.  It will serve as a great transition between seasons or whatever we call the days between hot and arctic in Michigan.

As for the pattern, this was my trial run for my super warm tundra-life winter coat.  I don't know if I will use this pattern for that.  Even though Kenneth fixed the length issue, I don't want to run into the same problem again.  Maybe I'll make a muslin of the front with facing just to be sure it works.  I plan to go all-in (pad stitching, hair canvas, interlining) with the coat and want to make sure everything is sound first.

Up next:  Probably another coat or two.  And maybe some more pants.  I still haven't given up on Starting from Scratch.  I'm in turtle mode for a while.

Until next time, peace!

L

34 comments:

  1. Hooray for finishing your coat! It's lovely.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you! I credit you for inspiring me to try a trench coat. I still remember your minty fresh trench. =)

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  2. Your new trench coat is fabulous! All that suffering and hard work has paid off. I find cotton is mostly cooperative but it can pucker when eased whereas wool is much more amenable to being shaped without puckering. Now that you've done the heavy lifting with this pattern, using it again should be much less painful.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Becca. =) I think in trying to get the curve to behave, I made it worse by over-pressing. You're right about the differences between cotton and wool; I haven't had nearly as much trouble with wool and princess seams.

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  3. Your coat is wonderful! Are you by chance in the Detroit area? Are you a member of the American sewing guild?

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    1. Thank you.! Yes, I am in the Detroit area. Are you?? I'm not a member of the ASG.

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  4. Oh L...It's fantastic!!! I love it so much and your lining is the perfect match so no surprise that you were willing to suffer a bit to make it work.

    It really is a classic that you'll love for awhile!

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    1. Thank you! I almost want the weather to get cooler so I can wear it more often. ALMOST. I loves me some hot weather.

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  5. I think it's great! Lot's of hard work went into it--I can tell.

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    1. Thank you Robin. Lots of hard work and swears. =) I was not feeling it at first.

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  6. Yay! I'm so glad that you finally finished this! The final coat looks amazing, and I doubt that anyone is going to notice that puckering at the bust.

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    1. Thank you Michelle! You know we're our own worst critics. =) All I see is the puckering. Oh well, I will wear it with pride!

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  7. Lovely coat! It was worth all the effort.

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    1. Thank you! I am very happy with it.

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  8. Replies
    1. Thank you! I was on the struggle bus for a minute, but I made it work. =)

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  9. Your coat looks amazing!!! Great job and hopefully you will get a chance to wear it between now and whenever the next polar vortex hits us here in Michigan!

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    1. Ugh! The weather in Michigan is sooooo loony! What was that cold spell last week all about?! Let's not even talk about the polar vortex!

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  10. YAY it's done! It looks great!!

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  11. It looks great! That pattern was very time consuming. I do want to make another.

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    1. Thank you! Did you make it too? Did you have a problems with the front facing not matching?

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  12. Your coat looks fabulous and it fits you quite nicely. Love it!

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  13. Wow, you put a lot of time and effort into making this coat and it shows, its beautiful! Enjoy wearing it : )

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    1. Hey hey James! Thank you. It was a labor of love and I'm happy it's over. =)

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  14. Awesome trench ! You did a phenomenal job.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you! I am almost tempted to finish the first trench I started. Heh. We'll see about that!

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  15. Glad to see your visit to Kenneth King was worthwhile! Your coat is beautiful! I rally love that lining.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, he was an immense help and funny as always! The lining gave me fits, but it worked out well. Thank you!

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  16. Your coat looks amazing and so glad the Kenneth King could save the day for you.

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  17. How did I miss this wonderful looking coat! Despite your difficulty, this turned out awesome! You must be really proud of your accomplishments even though you have a little assistance, it was ultimately your project!

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Thanks for commenting! I appreciate and read them all - even if I can not personally respond.

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